Thursday, April 10, 2008

Chicken Andouille Gumbo


This is one of my favorite recipe finds from Allrecipes.com. I've been making this gumbo for several years now. I love pairing it with a bowl of rice and garlic bread. The recipe does take some time to cook but it is in no way difficult to prepare. This is definitely comfort food at its best. Also, this recipe freezes very well.

Chicken Andouille Gumbo
Source: Allrecipes.com
  • 12 cups water
  • 3 pounds chicken parts
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 pounds okra
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 pound andouille sausage, sliced
  • 1 (28 ounce) can Italian-style whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon file powder
  1. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in heavy skillet over medium heat. Add okra and cook until no longer sticky, stirring frequently, about 20 minutes; set aside.
  2. Stir flour and remaining 1/2 cup oil in heavy large Dutch oven. Cook over medium heat until deep golden brown, stirring frequently, about 6 minutes. Add 4 cups reserved chicken cooking broth, okra, andouille sausage, tomatoes with their juices, bell pepper, celery, garlic, bay leaf, salt, thyme, basil, cayenne, and pepper. Cover partially and simmer until thickened, about 1 1/2 hours.
  3. Spoon off any fat from surface of gumbo. Add chicken and file powder to gumbo and simmer gently 15 minutes. (If preparing ahead, cover and refrigerate. Bring to simmer before serving.) Mound rice in shallow bowls if desired. Ladle gumbo over and serve.
Combine water and chicken in large pot. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer until chicken is tender, about 1 hour. Using tongs, transfer chicken to strainer and cool, saving cooking liquid. Remove meat from bones in pieces.

Note

File powder is a seasoning made from the ground, dried leaves of the sassafras tree. It's an integral part of Creole cooking, and is used to thicken and flavor Gumbos and other Creole dishes. File should be stirred into a dish after it's removed from the heat because undue cooking makes file tough and stringy.




1 comment:

Liv422 said...

Ooo...this looks so yummy! It's making me hungry just looking at it!